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20121101
20121130
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KQED (PBS) 85
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English 85
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 85 (some duplicates have been removed)
insurance premiums for customers down the road. here in new york city, commerce has been crippled. and power is not expected to be restored in many areas until next week. i.h.s. global predicts that if the areas affected by sandy lose a quarter of their output for just two days, it would knock about $25 billion off u.s. economic growth in the fourth quarter. that could be as much a 0.6%. but longer-term, some of the financial losses should be recovered by repair and rebuilding efforts. home improvement stores like home depot and lowes will likely get a boost in sales. many construction jobs will be created to rebuild homes and businesses. and governments will be spending huge amounts of money to repair subways, roads, and bridges so all of those efforts should help boost econoc activity early next year. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: joining us now for a closer look at sandy's economic impact, mark zandi, chief economist at moody's analytics. you know, mark, people often hear that when there's a sdater like zandi, that it's actually a boost to the economy. is that going to be tr
of staten island say they've been forgotten. >> this is new york city, the financial capital of the world. putting right what's happened here is going to take many months and maybe longer. >> and getting ready for new leaders in china. tonight we continue our series of special reports on the challenges they'll face. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. with just four days to go before the u.s. presidential election, a new jobs report is fueling arguments on the campaign trail. it seems to have something for everyone. president obama is time-outing that more jobs were -- touting that more jobs have been created than were expected. romney says the overall elm ploit rate is actually up. now startshe weekend blitz and the bbc's adam brooks has been watching the reaction for us. >> the voter in the state of ohio -- >> in 2008 we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. today our businesses have created nearly 5 1/2 million new jobs and this morning we learned the companies hired more workers in octo
in staten island. late today, new york city mayor michael bloomberg said most bridges and tunnels will be restricted to high-occupancy vehicles for next several days. but he said his city is on the road to recovery. >> bottom line is we've lost some people and pray for families. go forward here and keep this city going and make sure we have visitors and jobs for people. do that in the names we lost. thank you very much. >> reporter: in new jersey, aerial views from helicopters revealed scenes of total devastation. entire neighborhoods underwater in ocean county, an amusement park along the jersey shore in seaside heights in disarray, with some rides washed away by the waves. those displaced by the storm have been taking shelter in gymnasiums and other facilities. >> we never went trough anything like this. we may have had a storm where it blew a couple of things back and forth, but for it to be flooded out, all over the place, disheveled. >> i'm 69 years old and it's worse i've ever seen in my life. >> halloween will be on monday in new jersey, all right. >> reporter: today, new j
commute since the storm hit a week ago. it taxed transit systems to the limit in new york city, connecticut and parts of new jersey >> we keep missing trains because it's so packed you can't enter the trains >> reporter: lines stretched for blocks as thousands of people tried to get to work. trains from new jersey to new york remained out, but key subway lines connecting manhattan to brooklyn under the east river were open. and the statten island ferry was running. >> i don't think it's really normal for anyone right now. we have so much on our minds right now especially for those who have family that lost everything, you know. not normal yet. >> reporter: the trarns it challenges came on top of a cold night for thousands of people still without power with temperatures dropping into the 30s. >> we have hot soup, hot chocolate, blank hes, cleaning supplies >> reporter: some 1.4 million homes and businesses across seven states still were in the dark. well more than 700,000 of those were in new jersey where governor chris christie visited with victims and volunteers today. >> ther
hit areas of new york city, new jersey, and long island are up and running. for those who do get gas, they'll pay more for it. gasoline prices in the northeast have increased as much as 14 cents a gallon. >> tom: 1.3 million people are still without power tonight, one week after superstorm sandy. and as susie mentioned, temperatures are plummeting, as another storm approaches the northeast. having no power and no heat is one concern. but thousands of people have also been left homeless by the storm, and that is fueling worries about a housing shortage. erika miller reports. >> reporter: the new york city metropolitan area is slowly recovering after superstorm sandy. but many homes and businesses still don't have power, or heat. >> things that took months or years to build are gone, how quickly we can get it back i'm not sure, but there will certainly be places that don't have power for a very long time. >> reporter: lack of power is more than just an inconvenience, it's also safety issue. temperatures have started hitting the low 30's, and a nor'easter is forecast later this week. so
. meanwhile, the effects of the monster storm are paralyzing much of new jersey and new york city here's an update: four and a half million people are still without power, and it could take another ten days before power is restored. limited flights have resumed at all of the airports in the new york area. public schools are still closed in the city, as well as many schools in new jersey. and filling up on gas is the toughest problem of all. gas stations are running dry, and others do not have electricity to pump gas. motorists lined by the hundreds in new jersey, waiting and hoping for fuel. still ahead, we have more on sandy: flood insurance, the cost of getting power turned back on, and the challenge of getting around america's busiest city. >> tom: october marked a pick-up in private hiring. that's the word from payroll processing firm adp. it says u.s. private payrolls grew by 158,000 positions in october. that higher than expected number comes as adp overhauls how it calculates the number by including more companies in its survey. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: the economic si
of the new york city marathon. that and more tonight on "n.b.r.!" we begin with jobs. employers beefed up their payrolls last month, adding more jobs than expected as more americans counted themselves among the labor force. the official labor department count shows 171,000 jobs were created last month. that's much stroer than the 125,000 analysts were looking for. and the government revised its september new job count up to 148,000. thanks to more people looking for work, the unemployment rate rose slightly to 7.9%. darren gersh has the story from washington d.c. >> reporter: the october employment report makes it clear a jobs recovery is solidly underway. >> i think the key message there is that employment growth has been taken up a notch. over the last three months we've added over 170,000 jobs on average. that's a little bit better than what we've been seeing. that is enough over the long haul to bring the unemployment rate down, but slowly. >> reporter: one of the best things about this jobs report: payroll gains were broad-based. retailing added 36,000 jobs. health care 31,000 jobs.
, we have had incredible support from volunteers. to the north, in hoboken, across from new york city, emergency and national guard trucks moved through the flooded streets overnight. when "sandy" hit, the storm surge on the hudson river swamped a quarter of the city, leaving 20,000 people stranded in their homes and in the dark. >> it's really scary. we don't have that much food. we prepared a little bit. >> reporter: for others across new jersey, the loss of electricity meant no way to pump gas, which led to long lines at places where fuel was available. >> an hour and 40 minutes almost. crazy. i'm out of gas though, i have less than a quarter tank, so i had to get out today. >> brown: and financial help was >> there's nothing more precious to people than their homes. homes are where their families are, memories and possessions of their lives and there's also a sense of safety to home. you feel like when you get in that place and you close that door that there's a sense of safety there. that sense of safety was violated on monday. with water rushing into people's homes at an enormou
the region. police cars in new york city patrolled low-lying neighborhoods, urging people to evacuate again. the approaching nor'easter brought a wintry mix of cold and snow and possibly, minor flooding in already damaged coastal areas. new york mayor michael bloomberg: >> we haven't and won't order the kind of large scale evacuation we ordered in advance of hurricane sandy but if you are experiencing significant flooding during sandy you should consider taking shelter with friends and family at a safer spot or using one of the city's storm center shelters. >> sreenivasan: in new jersey, thousands of storm-weary people braced for their brush with the new storm, even as cleanup efforts continued from "sandy". governor chris christie suggested it was a little like the biblical plagues. >> when i finally got that final kind of, forecast that i got last night, i said i'm waiting for the locusts and pestilence next, you know. >> sreenivasan: the storm could also bring wind gusts of 65 miles an hour-- bedeviling efforts to restore power to more than 600,000 customers still in the dark in new jers
of the gas situation. >> suarez: frustration was also at a boil on new york city's staten island, where local officials complained they've been largely ignored since monday's storm. >> this is america, not a third world nation. we need food, we need clothing. >> suarez: another fight was brewing over running the new york city marathon sunday morning beginning on staten island. new york city mayor michael bloomberg defended the decision. >> it doesn't use resources that can really make a difference in recovery and that sort of thing. it's a different group of people. we have to work around the clock for people to get through this thing, and i assure you we're doing that. if i thought it took any resources away from that we would, we would not do this. >> bloomberg reversed course and announced the marathon was canceled. further adding to the frustration of many, the power was still off for well over three million customers, many of them in new york and new jersey. this man lives in far rockaway, in queens. >> we are not sitting around here singing "kumbaya." this is really a dangerous, dangero
and information services worldwide. from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin today with the middle east and continue our coverage of the conflict in gaza, hamas has fired close to 1,300 rockets into israel, many of them have been intercept bid the iron dome defense system, the israeli defense force is responding with air strikes on gaza, diplomatic efforts to secure a cease-fire have been unsuccessful so far. secretary of state hillary clinton met with prime minister netanyahu in a joint conflict the united states commitment to the israel is uncompromising. >> we came with a clear message, america's commitment to israel's security is rock solid and unwavering, that is why we believe it is essential to deescalate the situation in gaza. >> rose: the secretary of state travels to cairo tomorrow to take part in further negotiations, joining me now is rashid khalidi, he is the edward site professor of modern arab studies in columbia university, in washington dennis ross is with the washington institute for near east policy and a former u.s. envoy to the middle east
our infrastructure, our built environment. >> rose: new york city mayor michael bloomberg began and ended his briefing at city hall with words to those who lost hay loved one in the hurricane. new yorkers everywhere joined him extending their thoughts to the victims of disaster. >> everyone here hearts go out to the families of those who lost family in the storm and those who lost their homes. our thoughts and prayers are with everyone and we certainly will give our full support in the next weeks and months to those hurt by the storm. >> rose: we turn to an interview we taped earlier this week with the actor denzel washington. and director bob zemeckis. >> it all comes down to the script for me. when i read a screen play that i can't put down, and when i read a screen play that's unique and really well written and complex, i feel it's worthy to do. and then i heard that denzel was interested in doing it, and when iwhen i read the screen play it was like he was perfect for the part. so i called him up and said, are you really interested in this?" and he said, "year, i am." >> num
's flagship store in new york city. it's also investing in technology to beef up it's online presence. "n.b.r.'s" ruben ramirez caught up with macy's c.e.o. terry lundgren in new york this morning and began by asking him how sales are going. both in store and on-line. >> they're both growing and that's the good news for us and while the online business has been spectacular for macy's for several years, we really look at the consumer as an omnichannel consumer. so she comes in, she does her research on her phone. she decides what store she wants to shop. what items she wants to shop for. maybe going back to her desk and pulling the trigger there. so i think that's what happening today. so the line between online and physical stores is blurred. >> reporter: the past several years consumers have opened their wallets around the holidays but come january it seemed that that optimism faded. what are you expecting come january 2013? >> we've had 11 consecutive quarters of consistent growth of sales and earnings at macy's inc. we've found the formula. a lot of retailers depend on january to be a
news and information services worldwide. from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: once every ten years china changes its government, they do it the party congress in beijing, xi jinping was named president and chairman he succeeds huh engine too and chose six people who will run china, the six members of the standing committee of the politburo, many questions about china and the new leadership one is about the growth of the economy and others is about the tension in the country between urban and rural, conservative and liberal, many are concerned about the demographics of china, others are worried about the conflict with japan and always there is a question of the relationship between china and the united states. we talk about all of those questions this evening with ian bremmer, he is the president and founder of the eurasia group from washington, richard mcgregor of the financial times, the author of the party and jim fallows of the atlantic, his book ch
of "school of rock" and "dazed and confused." >> they went to a acapulco, new york city, that when first class. but this spring, somewhere along the way, -- >> all i want is for you to be a man for one thing you are life. -- for once in your life. >> there are people in town that would have shot her for $5. >> the nicest fellow i ever met. >> he didn't do it. >> an angel of death. tavis: when i first saw this, i cannot believe this was actually based on a true story. >> yes, true story. tavis: where do you find the humor in a story where a guy kills his wife? >> it is not a traditional comedy, because it is based on a true story. there is a real murder here. that is a very serious subject, so you don't want to make a mockery of the situation. you want to play it real, but there are some very peculiar things about this particular case. he is the most popular guy in this small texas town. everybody loves him. he is the least likely to be a convicted murderer. not only does he murder, but he hides the body in an ice locker and just goes about his daily business as if nothing has happened, f
us tonight from new york city. the dow have you back on the program. >> good to be with you. >> i mentioned all this drama, what happened at the closing bell the day? >> we saw a pretty good rally, there was rhetoric over the weekend that the two sides, republicans and democrats along with the president have the will to come together on these very important issues surrounding the fiscal cliff. has been a rocky situation as investors anticipate any outgoing talks from this conversation. we are not there yet at all. the markets are still down 5% because of the uncertainties about compromise. tavis: i was watching your show this weekend, i wake up this morning and read all the major newspapers, the new york times, beating the threat of higher taxes. investments fall off a cliff. tell me what about investors are doing or not doing if they can figure out where they are going. >> they talk about when the bush tax cuts will expire, the largest increase of all incomes, 90% of then comes coinciding with the elimination of spending programs to the tune of $600 billion. the fear is, we will
they played in new york city, listen to this. ♪ dedeliddle liddle... ♪ yeah ♪ dedeliddle liddle ♪ yeah ♪ dedeliddle liddle dedeliddle liddle ♪ ♪ liddle liddle liddle ♪ oh, little girl of mine ♪ gee, you sure look fine ♪ yes, you appeal to me ♪ i'll never set you free ♪ be my loving baby ♪ till the end of time ♪ i can't seem to get you ♪ off my mind ♪ the boys all roll their eyes ♪ as we go strolling by ♪ it's not so hard to see ♪ that they all envy me ♪ 'cause your mine, loving baby ♪ ♪ you belong to me ♪ that's the way it was ♪ meant to be ♪ well ♪ my baby ♪ oh, honey ♪ dedeliddle liddle liddle liddle ♪ ♪ yeah ♪ i think the marketplace is always moving because that's kind of the american way, you know. we have a tendency to discard those kinds of things that have gone past their useful life. ♪ doo mop ta doo mop ta doo mop duh duh ♪ ♪ ooh waa ooh waa ♪ ooh ooh wa ooh wa ♪ ooh ooh wa ooh wa ♪ why do fools fall in love? good music never goes past its useful life. good music is always part of the fabric of people's lives.
our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> this has been a difficult week for the city of new york four days after hurricane sandy made landfall life has not yet returned to normal. gas shortages, power outages and disruptions of mass transit stand in the way of a full recovery. joining me now is ray kelly, new york city police commissioner. his force has been at the front line of rescue and relief efforts. the police department is working overtime in all areas of the city. not only to detect criminal behavior but also to be engaged with all the people who are part of the response to this tragedy. i'm pleased to have ray kelly back on this program. welcome. >> good to be with you, charlie. >> rose: we taped this at 5:00 on this day. you just got a phone call about the marathon. >> yerk the mayor has decided to cancel the marathon. the marathon has always been a unifying force in the city. and he didn't want it to be something that resulted in division or divisiveness. so he's decided that the marathon shouldn't go forward but that the sponsors, he's asked the sponsors t
of mexico when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: it has been three days since hurricane sandy made land fall on the eastern coast of the united states. signs of recovery are beginning to appear. residents of storm hit areas are still coming to grips with the scale of the damage. neighborhoods in new york and new jersey remain under water while energy companies work to repair downed power line millions suspect another night without electricity. it may be over a week before power is restored in some places. as dawn broke this morning parts of the subway heaved into motion for the first time since sunday night. commuters eager to return to work with restrictions to auto transport. few in the northeast have not felt the effects of hurricane sand y. experts estimate the disaster will cost up to $50 billion but none forgot i that the true cost of the hurricane lies in the lost of human life. as we learn more about the events of this week some question about greater preparedness could have helped avert tra
care clinic at bellevue hospital in new york city. it's part of a national literacy program called reach out and read. books are given to children six months to five years old and parents are encouraged to read them aloud. >> he tried to started to read. to say a little things. >> reporter: why the doctor's office? because that's the one place where all children, including those most at risk, go regularly before they enter school. without some school experience before first grade, most low income children are almost guaranteed to begin school behind everyone else. and we are talking about a lot of children here: 5.1 million american children under the age of five are growing up in poverty. so what are states doing to get these kids ready for first grade? see for yourself. only ten states and the district of columbia tell schools they must provide full day kindergarten. 34 states require half day programs, and six states do not require any kindergarten at all. preschool programs like head start reach about one third of three and four year olds. and, in spite of their proven success,
new york city youth -- losing huge parts of its infrastructure, losing electrical service, losing subways because they were flooded. it is not just a matter of trying to prepare in the sense of being able to respond to the storm, but thinking about how we build cities and electrical grids that are more resilient in extreme weather events like sandy. >> is there a chance that an event like this or the prospect of multiple events like this, because as we have heard from the governor of new york, these things are writing more and more frequently, will actually be the catalyst that forces the country and politicians to take leadership and do what is needed on critical issues like infrastructure, like climate change? >> if anything is going to do it, i think it will be programs like this one. the united states, like a lot of countries, can be very short term in its leadership and thinking. we tend to be disaster driven and follow what ever happened last. this should give us an image is to deal with this problem, but at the same time, we had hurricane katrina seven years ago. we had the
be so much easier. so we're looking at like payment. >> reporter: in new york city, sabrina norrie and kelli space have an idea of their own, called zero bound. if students are struggling to pay debt in dollars, why not pay it through community service? they're still raising money, but once it's up and running, the company will help borrowers get donations in exchange for volunteer work. >> i thought, there's got to be a way we can get creative about this. and being involved in volunteer work, i thought, lets see if we can invest that education of students and alumni back into the community through volunteering. >> reporter: innovations like these have the support of the federal government, in a report last month, the consumer financial protection bureau said if they work, private businesses could play an important role in helping student borrowers pay down their debts. sylvia hall, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: for many people the holidays are typically a time to make charitable contributions. americans gave $200 billion to non-profits last year, and half of that came from the w
! >> susie: federal reserve chairman ben bernanke came to new york city today to send a tough message back to washington-- get your act together. he urged lawmakers and the white house to reach a quick deal to avoid the fiscal cliff, saying it might mean next year could be "a very good one for the economy." ben bernanke didn't endorse any specific tax or spending policies to solve the fiscal cliff, but he urged lawmakers to think creatively. he said an agreement on ways to reduce long-term federal budget deficits could remove road blocks to growth. on the other hand, going over the cliff might mean a recession. on top of that, worries about a deal were already causing trouble. >> uncertainty about how the fiscal cliff, the raising of the debt limit, and the longer-term budget situation will be addressed appears already to be affecting private spending and investment decisions, and may be contributing to an increased sense of caution in financial markets. >> susie: wall street and business leaders were pleased that bernanke was talking tough. and they said the fed's role in the fiscal cliff
to fill 'er up. >> reporter: here in new york city, the long lines and gas rationing are finally gone, but there's more good news. like the rest of the nation, gas is actually cheaper now than before superstorm sandy. a month ago, superstorm sandy shut down refineries in the northeast, delayed oil shipments and left many gasoline stations without power. in some hard hit areas, prices spiked more than ten cents a gallon. but now, the situation has drastically improved here and around the country. regular unleaded costs an average of $3.42 nationwide. that's 12 cents below where it was a month ago. but drivers are still paying about 12 cents more for gas today than a year ago. a big reason is escalating middle east tensions. >> anytime you have that kind of conflict in the middle east, whether it's the israelis or the egyptians, the syrians, it really the disruption of flow, you know. any time you get a problem in the gulf, it's really going to hinder oil prices. >> reporter: if the recent cease-fire between hamas and israel in the gaza strip holds, many think prices at the pump will dr
this city back stronger and better than ever before. >> new york city, no electricity, no lights, millions in the dark, fires, subways flooded, ruined rampant, many deaths. >> people work in the subway system, in the construction industry in this state have said they've never seen damage like this, so it's a new reality for us, and i think it's one that we're going to have to deal with. >> besides new york, new jersey was a victim of the disaster. governor chris christie reviewed the situation at the shoreline, president obama at his side. >> we are here for you, and we will not forget. we will follow up to make sure that you get all the help you need until you've rebuilt. >> later, at a news conference, the governor gave his report. >> the president of the united states and i have had six conversations since sunday. that shows a level of caring and concern and interest that i think a leader should be giving to this type of situation. so today, in fact, reed asked me this after i got off, after you know, i said good-bye to him after air force one, this was as comfortable and relaxing inter
and also the new york city production location. and what it is is a model 1851 colt's patent revolver. it's not made in 1851. that's just the model. they made these on up until 1873, which was still way before teddy roosevelt. if we turn the gun over, we have the serial number. it's 128,000. and thanks to mr. colt's bookkeepers, we know that that was made in 1862. oh, okay. so it was made during the heart of the civilar. what's special about it is that we have the letter e. yes. and that's very important for a colt firearm. that lets us know that it was to be engraved or embellished. this gun has beautiful scrollwork. yes. classic styling. i mean, it... wow. if you notice, there's a wolf's head. you can see the eye, the mouth. that's the sign of being engraved at the shop of gustav young, who was the premier engraver for colt firearms. he was like the picasso of gun working. oh, my god. to a colt guy, that sends chills up your arm. because it's not signed by him, it doesn't have his name on it, we can't say that he's the one that engraved it. we know that it's in his style and is going to
quarter in new york city. she married tom foley, her high school sweetheart, and began her life as a marine wife. nine years later, their daughter kathleen was born. life was good. but then, after 54 years of marriage, tom got sick. >> my husband died of lung cancer. and he went through chemo and radiation, and then more chemo and then more radiation. and he was sick and miserable frequently, if not most of that time. but because i saw how he suffered, i made up my mind, i... when it was my turn, i was going to make sure that i don't go that way. >> narrator: in 2006, joan got remarried to art butterstein, a 86-year-old widower. then, two years later, she found out that she too had lung cancer. >> i told them immediately. i said, "i have no intention of going through all the chemo. not at my age, and not with what i know is already wrong with my body. it's not going to make me have a lovely old life." all right, what about this? 34 down. >> "words seen in brackets." >> s-i-c, sic. >> a few months ago, she went to the doctor, and doctor said, "i think it might be time to sign up
in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin with attacks by israel and hamas. in israel, three civilians have been killed and dozens wounded, hamas has fired more than one thousand rockets into israel, many of which have been intercepted by the iron dome missile defense system. the world watches nervously as the buildup of israeli troops continue along the border. today secretary general ban ki-moon arrived in cairo to support egyptian-led efforts at a cease-fire. yesterday, president obama spoke about the situation from thailand, he is viz thing country as part of a three-country asia tour. >> we are fully supportive of israel's right to defend itself from missiles landing on people's homes and workplaces and potentially killing civilians. and we will continue to support israel's right to defend itself. >> rose: here's what "cbs evening news" reported today from the war zone. >> an angry crowd gathered outside a hospital in gaza this morning as bodies of children killed in yesterday's air strike were brought out to be buried. the four children died, along with their mot
to perform on a broadway stage in the heart of new york city. that's unheard of for a lot of kids our age. and so we're really blessed and thankful for this opportunity. so thank you so much for this once in a lifetime opportunity. yes. i have made some incredible friendships these last six days that i know are going to last me for a lifetime. and so i just want to say thank you to everyone. thanks. (cheers and applause) ♪ here right now here right now this is what we're living for ♪ this is when we give in to the moment and let go... ♪ >> the closing for me is always emotional. it makes me cry every single time, because it's... in that moment i feel like these 60 kids come together and look at each other, and it's a moment of "i did it. i accomplished something that i never knew was possible." >> ♪ here is where we start becoming all we want to be... ♪ >> i always knew that i wanted to be up onstage. winning the jimmy is an immense honor. but now it shows me that i have still a long, long way to go. and i'm willing to do it. i'm willing to work for it. >> ♪ so much for us to
sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> tonight we continue to exploring our brain with the conversation about pain. pain serves a very important function for us to survive, it teaches us what to avoid and lets us know when to seek medical help. at the same time, though it can create tremendous suffering. st. augustine once said the greatest evil is physical pain, 100 million americans live with it every day would yo would wouo doubt agree, pain knows no boundaries, regardless of age and race, beyond the physical symptoms the experience of chronic pain often leads to feelings of isolation and hopelessness. >> laura klein had been living with pain since a knee injury in 2008 and joins me this evening to speak about her experiences and incredible group of scientists are also here to discuss how we perceive and process pain, david bar stiewk of children's hospital and david julius of the university of california, san francisco, allan basbaum, also of the university of california san francisco, robert dworkin of the university of rocheste
to prevent damage from the next major storm. the state, along with new york city, will ask for federal disaster aid based on the damage tally. one of the legendary bands of rock 'n' roll is marking its golden anniversary. the rolling stones celebrated 50 years last night in london, with the first of five shows in the united kingdom and the u.s. nina nannar of independent television news filed this report. >> two and a half hours, 23 songs, and 50 years. . ♪ i said hey, hey, you, you. ♪ get off of my cloud. ♪ hey, hey, you, you, get of my cloud. ♪ hey, hey, you, you, get off of my cloud ♪ >> thankfully for the rolling stones glowing reviews on this, their opening night of their anniversary tour. ♪ i want to be your lover, baby i want to be your man ♪ >> reporter: the men have a combined age of 273 years. but last night, they were clearly enjoying their trip down memory lane. even jagger's joke about the controversial ticket prices "how you doing in the cheap seats?" he asked, did not spoil the mood of the fans who came from all over the world. >> i came all the way from au
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 85 (some duplicates have been removed)